Tolkien’s Lost “Noel”

Originally published in the 1936 Annual of Our Lady’s School, Abingdon, Tolkien’s “Noel” was unknown and unrecorded until scholars Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull discovered it while searching for another poem in June 2013. In May 2015, Our Lady’s School, Abingdon discovered their copy of the Annual and in Feb 2016, news of the…

One-hundred and twenty-second birthday: J. R. R. Tolkien, born January 3, 1892

The one C. S. Lewis called a “smooth, pale, fluent little chap,” [1] J. R. R Tolkien (1892-1973), was born one-hundred and twenty-two years ago today. Now world renowned for The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings stories, Tolkien continues to inspire all those who venture into Middle Earth, and then venture there and…

7 Summits with Owen Strachan

With the recent release of Seven Summits in Church History, designed to give a brief introduction to major figures in the history of Christianity for churches and all readers, I have asked several friends, pastors, and scholars to answer: Who are your “Seven Summits”? Or, what figures in church history would you enjoy sharing a…

My Philology Problem

“People thought Tolkien was joking when he later said that he wrote The Lord of the Rings to bring into being a world that might contain [his] Elvish greeting …. The remark is witty – but also deadly serious.” – Phillip and Carol Zaleski, The Fellowship, 26. J. R. R. Tolkien loved words. More than…

Lecturing Lewis

I have been enjoying The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings by Philip and Carol Zaleski. Particularly, for the way they bring to life in news ways various facets of Tolkien and Lewis.  For example, here are some of the details they provide about C. S. Lewis as a classroom lecturer: Reminiscences by those…